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The “sensitive phone addicts”

Staff and Lily Antor

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Our generation is incessantly criticized, whether it be for using our phones too often, being too sensitive, or caring too much about our appearances. We are condemned because our generation is ‘different.’ Older people like our parents and teachers don’t understand us because we have grown up in a world drastically different from the one in which they were raised.

It is incredibly unfair, however, to dub this generation as “failed.” Every single generation varies in some degree from the previous one. As for us? We are the just the one some people cannot understand simply because they do not bother trying. Everyday we are reminded of the fact that adults think we don’t know how to communicate with others because we’re “always on our phones.” We are ridiculed because we “cannot get off our phones” or because we can’t look up for more than “two seconds.” The idea that we use technology too much is stupid. We don’t blame the previous generations for using the microwave or ball point pens too much. The use of technological devices is an inherent aspect of growing up in the twenty first century. There is nothing adults can do to change that.

Illustration by Megan Rinock

Not to mention that our parents seem to use technology just as much as we do. They shouldn’t act like they don’t buy their kids phones just to get them off their backs. Parents always seem to be tagging us in a new Facebook post whenever we leave the house. Rather than trying to break the stereotype that our generation is addicted to our phones, we should all accept that this is the age of technology for everyone. If you take a look around, you can see grandparents and parents glued to their phones: it’s not just us who struggle to look up sometimes.

The invention and innovation of technology is good, as we are able to use it not only to communicate, but to learn in an educational environment that is extremely competitive. Yeah, there are a ton of kids who are rude about their cell phone use, but there are also those of us who like socializing with others and know how because we are, contrary to popular belief, functioning human beings. Adults seem to always remind us millenials that we “don’t know real work” and that we’re “lazy.” What is real work and what makes ours any less important? We do not appreciate that our generation is labeled as lazy, sensitive and handed everything on a silver platter. Don’t assume that just because of the decade we were born in that we don’t have jobs. Plenty of us, in fact, manage part time jobs on top of all our school work and extracurriculars. People saying that this generation is full of “special snowflakes” is also idiotic. We should be happy that our society has advanced to the point where we feel comfortable to express who we are, rather than conforming to expectations of the past. We are smart, we are hardworking, and we are capable of cleaning up this mess of a world that baby boomers have left for us. If recognizing society’s weaknesses makes us “snowflakes” we are okay with that. Addressing mental health, minority struggles, and political issues does not make us weak. It makes us smart.

Lastly, if we hear one more time that we are self-absorbed, we may just lose it. Yes, some teenagers are constantly posting pictures of themselves and spending hours getting ready in the morning. However, we give props to those people for having confidence in themselves! Liking how you look is a gift, why not flaunt it? Self love should not be seen by older generations as shallow, it should be observed as an achievement. It is something that us youngins have been forced to teach ourselves in a world that constantly labels us as dressing “inappropriately” just for trying to be comfortable in our own skin. Taking selfies? It’s not self-obsession. It’s not being fake. It’s being happy enough with yourself to say you love how you look on a certain day. Who is anyone to tear a person down for that? Yes, adults! We are the failed generation. We are addicted to our phones, we are way too privileged, and we are incredibly self-obsessed. But, older generations, take a second to recognize your own faults. You raised us, you created the environment and society in which we live. If you have complaints, file them to yourselves. We, on the other hand, will be working on building our brighter future. It’s your choice, adults, if you want to join us.

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8 Comments

8 Responses to “The “sensitive phone addicts””

  1. Bell Shapiro on March 14th, 2018 11:54 am

    This article is very well written, and I agree with all of it! I can’t tell you how many times my step dad tells me to give up the Internet, and only an hour later he’s glued to the news! I wish that adults could see things in the perspective we see them. The phones, the computers, all of them are tools to use. Nobody yells at adults for using their computers in work all the time, so why is it so bad that we like our phones?

  2. Caiden Price on March 14th, 2018 11:54 am

    I agree that many people view our generation as “failed” because of how we use our cell phones, and believe they are incorrect.

  3. Maithreyi Narayanan on March 14th, 2018 11:57 am

    I totally agree with this article. I also think it will be hard to get out of this habit but we can certainly try to keep our phones away when we are with our family. The main problem is that our phones are stuck with us in our pockets and we tend to open it as soon as we get a notification. We can try to keep our phones far away and have real conversations with people near us. 🙂

  4. nathaniel on March 14th, 2018 11:58 am

    i agree we should not be labeled as lazy.

  5. Sofia Huffman on March 14th, 2018 2:24 pm

    i totally agree with this article! My older brother moved out recently but when ever he comes over and your trying to talk to him he usually is on his phone and like 2 minutes after you ask him a question he will finally put his phone away and just asks, What? And this is going throughout my family now cause my other brother just got a phone. I never do this to people cause i consider it very rude.

  6. Andrea on March 14th, 2018 2:28 pm

    I agree with all of your points in the article, but especially how we are not only the ones on our phones because parents are also glued.

  7. Olivia Coughlin on March 14th, 2018 2:28 pm

    This is something I’ve found myself thinking of a lot lately and I don’t think I’ve ever agreed with something more. This article was so well written and put in such a clear and organized way. This makes me feel better about how the world is today, and I think that more adults and kids alike should read this.

  8. Aidan St. Peter on March 14th, 2018 2:29 pm

    Well said! I do agree that the world views our generation as a “ruined attempt,” but you made some very valid points. I can’t believe how many adults act differently towards me because they think I’m a self-obsessed, moody teenager. In reality, teenagers are some of the most kindest people I know. The adults need to stop glaring at us and check their own history.

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